What Are Sunglasses For?

When choosing a pair of sunglasses, it’s important to choose ones that block UVA and UVB light. You can find models in all price ranges, but buying the highest protection level is recommended. While a particular color may attract you, doctors say the UV rating of the Gucci sunglasses lens is more important than the tint. For example, those who suffer from macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy should consider wearing sunglasses with amber or brown lenses.

Protecting eyes from glare

Discomforting glare is caused by light reflected from a smooth surface and interferes with the human eye’s ability to manage light. It is particularly distracting and can cause eye fatigue and eyestrain. The severity of this condition depends on the person’s light sensitivity. Unprotected eyes respond to glare by squinting and constricting their pupils. In addition, they may try to shield their eyes or turn away from the source of the glare.

Moreover, glare on a computer screen can cause eye strain and prevent your eyes from adjusting to the content. For this reason, you should use glasses or sunglasses with an anti-reflective coating. Also, make sure that you use lower voltage bulbs. Lower ambient light levels are ideal for the office environment. A regular eye examination can help you prevent eye conditions like glare. Visiting an eye care professional can discuss the problem and prevent future issues.

Protecting eyes from ultraviolet rays

The effects of excessive exposure to UV rays are not limited to aging but also include eye cancer, skin cancer, and eye growths, such as photokeratitis. Children are particularly susceptible to UV exposure as they get three times more UV exposure than adults. The risk of eye cancer increases when people are exposed to heavy snow or ice reflection. Even though UV exposure to children can be limited, it is important to protect the eyes during peak hours of exposure.

Sunglasses should provide 100% UV protection and block 80% of all visible light. They should also let you see colors clearly and allow you to see the sun’s rays without distortion. Lens color does not matter as long as they block the sun’s rays. Reddish-brown lenses absorb the greatest amount of HEV rays. Sunglasses with UV protection are important even in the shade.

Protecting eyes from snow glare

Winter months can be particularly dangerous for the eyes. Snow reflects about 80 percent of the sun’s UV rays, so your eyes are more exposed to harmful UV rays. Long periods of exposure to bright sunlight can burn the eye’s surface and cause a painful condition called photokeratitis. Overexposure can also cause cataracts and cancer of the eyelids and skin surrounding the eyes.

Invest in sunglasses that protect your eyes from UV and HEV rays. Winter increases your exposure to UV and HEV rays and your risk of skin cancer. Look for polycarbonate lenses that block 100% UV rays and frames made of shatter-resistant polycarbonate. If you’re planning on participating in winter sports, choose a pair of sunglasses with 100 percent UV protection and polarized lenses.

Protecting eyes from glare coming from reflective surfaces

Glare from reflective surfaces can be dangerous and distracting. Not only does it cause eye fatigue, but it can also result in temporary blindness. Many lens products are now available with anti-reflective treatments to decrease glare and improve visual comfort. Anti-reflective treatments can be added to other lenses, including polarized lenses and photochromics. They are also available as part of a combination with eye protection.

Glare from reflective surfaces is both direct and reflected. The latter can cause eye fatigue and eyestrain and worsen conditions like cataracts. In addition, fluorescent lights and household lamps contribute to photosensitivity. Direct sunlight coming through windows can cause visual problems. Halogen bulbs are also problematic for some people, as their bright light can cause eye fatigue. To avoid these problems, use sunglasses or other protective devices.

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